Romney’s language of blame indicates a personality that believes itself powerless and uncared for

“Mitt Romney’s evolution on various issues has made it hard for many voters to get a read on him, but this much is clear: the man sure can deliver a tongue-lashing,” writes the estimable and insightful Alec MacGillis in post to WaPo’s The Trail titled Mitt Romney’s Way with Words.

Judging from his recent statements on the trail, one gets the sense that, as happy as the Romney boys all now seem while stumping for their father, the Romney household was probably not a place one wanted to be when young Tagg or Matt failed to mow the lawn or write a thank you note. The former Massachusetts governor may spare the rod, but he sure doesn’t spare the adjectives:

First, there was his upbraiding of Larry Craig the morning after news broke of the Idaho senator’s arrest in a Minneapolis airport bathroom. While some other Republicans adopted a wait and see pose, Romney wasted no time in separating himself from the co-chair of his Idaho campaign advisory committee: “Once again, we’ve found people in Washington have not lived up to the level of respect and dignity that we would expect for somebody that gets elected to a position of high influence. Very disappointing. He’s no longer associated with my campaign, as you can imagine… I’m sorry to see that he has fallen short,” Romney said on CNBC. He added, “The truth of the matter is, the most important thing we expect from an elected official is a level of dignity and character that we can point to for our kids and our grandkids, and say, `Hey, someday I hope you grow up and you’re someone like that person.’ And we’ve seen disappointment in the White House, we’ve seen it in the Senate, we’ve seen it in Congress. And frankly, it’s disgusting”more

Conclusion: Romney, in his speech and his writing, affects the pose of a blamer. What do we know about blamers?

The Blamer feels powerless and uncared-for. All alone in the world, they feel that nobody will ever do anything for them.

When they feel stressed, their feelings of isolation increase further. As a result, they compensate by trying to take charge, bluffing their way out, hiding their aloneness in attempted leadershipmore [emphasis ours]

More on Romney’s campaign of blame and accusation:

yours &c.
dr. g.d.

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  1. 1 Romney’s inflection point—the strange rhetoric of a troubled campaign « who is willard milton romney?

    […] The argument is functionally identical to a rationale or an alibi. Many Republicans may oppose us, the Romney supporter is invited to rationalize: but real Republicans support us. Hence: raw numbers, or the actual non-performance of the ailing Romney campaign, fails to tell the real story. To dissociate the real from the apparent is often the instrument of the scold, e.g. “if you really loved me”—this is emerging as Romney’s preferred idiom, see: Romney’s language of blame indicates a personality that believes itself powerless and uncared for […]

  2. 2 how Romney treats his friends: Craig speaks out against Romney’s betrayal « who is willard milton romney?

    […] Romney’s language of blame indicates a personality that believes itself powerless and uncared for […]

  3. 3 eyeon08.com: “Mitt Romney should be ashamed of himself, not that he’s capable of that. And not that he’s at any risk of winning the presidency anyways.” « who is willard milton romney?

    […] Also see: Romney’s language of blame indicates a personality that believes itself powerless and uncared for […]




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